Sunday Surfing 05/06/16

HP6078

 

‘I think If you’re going  to choose a place to die, then Mars is probably, you know,  not a bad choice.’  – Elon Musk at the Code Conference.

 

Building Rapport

This is the article that sparked my last post as it inspired hope for an evolved Martian response in the individual as we all redress unfinished business in our Scorpio-house matters. Perhaps our methods earlier this year could be called, ‘How Not to Interrogate Suspects’.  Read it from an applied personal perspective (loosely speaking, of course!) and see what you come up with…

Reporter and author, Robert Kolker, in the magazine section of wired.com:

Police veterans aren’t exactly eager to be told they’ve been doing their job wrong for 30 years. “I think we can overcome that pushback by focusing on the younger guys in our division,” [Tim] Marcia [LAPD] says. There’s an entrenched culture behind that blue wall—and a new, labor-intensive technique based on “rapport-building” might not be the most likely thing to breach it. “Interrogation and interview is a very egocentric thing,” Stearns says. For some police departments, and for some interrogators, it may be a nonstarter to do anything other than treat a suspect with suspicion.

 

Sensory Experience

Lotje’s story was a timely find because one of my clients experienced a stroke this past April at the age of forty-four. While his was far less debilitating, it helped us and enhanced our conversations. Life becomes more meaningful for everyone close to the person experiencing a transit as metamorphic as this.

I still can’t read for more than a few minutes at a time (these words are brought to you courtesy of Siri), but I see more of the world; a world that may not always have left-to-right linear patterns, but is intuited instead through subtle sensory experience. I see my stroke as a kind of rebirth; unexpected and painful, but also more vivid, filled with purpose, meaning and potential. – Lotje Sodderland

Lotje includes a fascinating sketch she made of one of her visions and I immediately thought of the phoenix in its newly hatched and uncomely state…

 

Aligning Mental Models

Edge.org featured educator Howard Gardner says, ‘When I was working on The App Generation with Katie Davis, we realized that most kids nowadays growing up in the developed society have never gotten lost. If they don’t have some kind of a device, their parents do, and they can find them. Getting lost for all of human history was part of life. Nobody ever got lost permanently; you got found or, more probably, you found yourself. That simple thing is very profound…                .’

‘What questions am I asking?  Here’s one: Are the pre-conceptions I have about education at all being borne out by what we find out from the people on these campuses? I’m asking what are their mental models. How do the students think about higher education? How do their parents think, etc.? Another bit of social science terminology: we are interested in alignment and misalignment.

When everybody says the same thing, it’s not very interesting to us. But if all the heads of schools talk about the importance of training good citizens, while parents and students never mention that, that’s a misalignment. If parents talk a lot about getting jobs but faculty say, “It’s not our business to get people jobs”—that’s a misalignment.’

 

One for the Knuckle Draggers

This one just has baffled and frustrated and excited me all at the same time. This sounds so…I want to say precious… I want to know more but I also realize that what we will be able to confirm will barely scratch the surface.

Ed Yong reports in The Atlantic about a meeting place in a cave, 336 meters inside the earth, last used ‘176,500 years ago, give or take a few millennia’. Wow!

‘The discovery suggested that Neanderthals were more sophisticated than anyone had given them credit for. They wielded fire, ventured deep underground, and shaped the subterranean rock into complex constructions. Perhaps they even carried out rituals; after all, there was no evidence that anyone actually lived in the cave, so what else were the rings and mounds for?’  This is one unfolding story to keep track of.

 

Your Choice: Seeing Oppositions as Rooted in One and the Same

Spiritual realization does not consist in escaping the world but in seeing it as it is.

Of the metaphysical transparency of phenomena we can say this: Every phenomenon has a metaphysical root whose universal form is reflected in the phenomenon itself, so that the outward form is only an image or reflection of the inward meaning or essence. The manifest part of a tree, i.e. its trunk and branches, has the same form as the unmanifest part of the tree, its root. Thus, the soil, or that which separates earth from heaven, is really the plane of reflection through which the unmanifest essence projects itself into the manifest form. This portrays the universal architectonic of Reality which regenerates itself, much like a fractal, beginning from the Godhead and repeating itself all the way up to the most mundane aspect of any phenomenon. This universal form, i.e. the polarity of principle and projection, is the origin of all dualities: Essence and form, mind and matter, subject and object, ego and world, lord and the servant, heaven and the earth, creator and creature, up and down, north and south, wave and particle, the I and the other, happiness and misery, profit and loss, friend and enemy, union and separation, good and evil, with and without, inward and outward, light and darkness, life and death, mortality and immortality, here and there, now and then, right and left, me and you, etc. Now you get to make only two moves, either toward your root and principle, i.e. your first cause, or away from it, to become whole or remain a hole. To perceive in all these pairs the presence of one and the same principle, one and the same meaning; this is the metaphysical transparency of phenomena, that is, to see the painter in the painting.  

 Tomaj Javidtash, metaphysicist

 

Last but certainly not least, I am wishing you a notable Gemini New Moon!

– weaver

 

 

Sunday Surfing 20/03/16

While it’s true that the Sun now turns its pulsating beams upon the warrior’s way, we may still feel we are somewhat pleasantly wading through water-color scenery. That’s how it feels here and we are leaning into it. Any lagging pace wont last much long, thats for sure. In honor of our Pisces pile-up, particularly the potentially luscious Venus conjunction with Neptune, percolate on some quantum-ly quotes that span the spirit and concrete worlds…

 

Intelligence operates simultaneously at two distinct levels: In one level it is the pure onlooker, the Witness; in another, the lower level, it is the actor and constitutor. These two distinct levels of activity of God or the higher Intellect, the one transcendent and the other immanent, is reflected in the human plane as the two principal modes of wakefulness, i.e. a wakefulness in the world and a wakefulness to the world: This is the distinction between the active and the contemplative life. But even the active life, action here implying outward mobility, is founded on the contemplative activity of the spirit. After all, everything is contemplation, for the One is contemplation par excellence: It is contemplation that creates, i.e. transcendentally constitutes, the field of action. – Tomaj Javidtash, metaphysicist

 

outerplaces.com reports that Dr. Hans-Peter Dürr, former head of the Max Planck Institute for Physics in Munich, posits that, just as a particle “writes” all of its information on its wave function, the brain is the tangible “floppy disk” on which we save our data, and this data is then “uploaded” into the spiritual quantum field. Continuing with this analogy, when we die the body, or the physical disk, is gone, but our consciousness, or the data on the computer, lives on…and Dr. Christian Hellwig of the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen, found evidence that information in our central nervous system is phase encoded, a type of coding that allows multiple pieces of data to occupy the same time. He said, “Our thoughts, our will, our consciousness and our feelings show properties that could be referred to as spiritual properties…No direct interaction with the known fundamental forces of natural science, such as gravitation, electromagnetic forces, etc. can be detected in the spiritual. On the other hand, however, these spiritual properties correspond exactly to the characteristics that distinguish the extremely puzzling and wondrous phenomena in the quantum world.”

The ever-fascinating edge.org conversations series recently featured Stephen Wolfram speaking on AI and the Future of Civilisation:

The interesting language point is that today we have computer languages, which, for the most part, are intended for computers only. They’re not intended for humans to read and understand. They’re intended to tell computers in detail what to do. Then we have natural language, which is intended for human-to-human communication.

I’ve been trying to build this knowledge-based language, where it’s intended for communication between humans and machines in a way where humans can read it and machines can understand it too, where we’re incorporating a lot of the existing knowledge of the world into the language in the same way that in human natural language we are constantly incorporating knowledge of the world into the language, because it helps us in communicating things. One branch that I’m interested in right now is what the world looks like when most people can read and write code.

What’s the future of the humans in a world where, once we can describe what we want to do, things can get done automatically? What do the humans do? One of my little hobby projects is trying to understand the evolution of human purposes over time. Today, we’ve got all kinds of purposes. We sit and have a big discussion about purposes, which presumably has some purpose. We do all the different things that we do in the world.

Can you imagine a world in which we all naturally read and write in a virtually universal code? In pure symbols. I wonder how the emergence of this phenomenon would influence the artistic communities of the world. Personally, I’m thinking: fascinating, even alluring in an abstract way, with a slice of dread…  🙂

And last but not least, a possible fly in our ointment:

‘Science is regarded as rational, but we must remember that it is formed by ideology and national emotions.’ Professor Michael Schultz, University of Agder (source)

 

 

 

 

Sunday Surfing 28/02/16

Greetings on this day of Sun/Neptune conjunction…I am totally claiming that as the reason this is hours late getting out. Lets warm up with an easy one; can you see Saturn in Sagittarius in this…

Ancient cultures aren’t that different from us, says [space archaeologist Sarah] Parcak. People told mother-in-law jokes in Mesopotamia, and have been posting cats on walls since ancient Egypt. Parcak sees herself and her fellow archaeologists not as adventurers looking for objects, but as spokespeople for the people and cultures who came before. “The most important thing that we do as archaeologists is acknowledge that past people existed and lived lives worth knowing,” she says. “I wish for us to discover the millions of unknown archaeological sites across the globe. By creating a 21st century army of global explorers, we’ll find and protect the world’s hidden heritage, which contains humankind’s collective resilience and creativity… A hundred years ago archaeology was for the rich, 50 years ago it was mainly for men, now it is primarily for academics. Our goal is to democratize the process of archeological discovery and allow anyone to participate.”

Why does gravity wave and why does it matter? Great questions and a great primer on this latest scoop.

 

This is just so good, no matter who you are or what you’re doing: Dr. Bradberry shares research from the queen of happiness.

‘The breakthrough in Dr. Lyubomirsky’s research is that you can make yourself happier—permanently. Lyubomirsky and others have found that our genetic set point is responsible for only about 50% of our happiness, life circumstances affect about 10%, and a whopping 40% is completely up to us. The large portion of your happiness that you control is determined by your habits, attitude, and outlook on life.’

The article goes on to list some examples of lifestyle that might be draining your personal kool-aid and I found I can be guilty of two. How ’bout you?

 

Mathematics and certain basic theories can be and must be validated by experiments as “fact”. However, interpretation of what it all “means” usually is a map masquerading as a territory. And unfortunately, that happens continuously, and is communicated to the less knowledgable public which does not have the means to understand the errors.  Edgar Mitchell (7 April 2000) in correspondence with Cynthia Sue Larson

Yes, we are letting our inner geek out for some air. But from a philosophical point of view, I can see Mitchell’s sentiment applying across all social strata…it’s HUGEly important not to confuse the map with territory on the journey of living. The map is helpful, for sure, but it’s a tool, not REALITY. Continuing our geek-out right along this theme…

‘(Sir Arthur) Eddington imagined a team of scientists investigating ocean life. They throw a net, with gaps two inches wide, into the water. Each time they retrieve their catch, they find it full of creatures that have two basic characteristics. Each creature has gills and is more than two inches long. Eddington then asks which is a fundamental property? Are see creatures all larger than two inches or do they all have gills? By analogy, we retrieve from the sea of knowledge only what the mesh of our methodology allows. Our methodology could retrieve a sea creature without gills on the next try, but a net two inches in size will never catch creatures less than two inches. Hence team of scientist would conclude a two inch creature size is a fundamental property of the ocean world. Since all knowledge is filtered through our Brain, which by analogy has characteristics, such as a two inch net spacing, it is very likely that some of its characteristics are inadvertently assigned to the reality we are trying to measure. Therefore interpretations of experimental results can project properties onto the real world that are actually unrecognized artifacts of the methodology we use to perform experiments.’

That’s part of an essay by Wolfgang Baer, Research Director, Nascent Systems Inc, Formerly Associate Research Prof. Naval Postgraduate School. There are more great (though sometimes somewhat heavy) geek-out essays in that link. I recommend. 🙂 

 

Benjamin Franklin: I wish it were possible… to invent a method of embalming drowned persons, in such a manner that they might be recalled to life at any period, however distant; for having a very ardent desire to see and observe the state of America a hundred years hence, I should prefer to an ordinary death, being immersed with a few friends in a cask of Madeira, until that time, then to be recalled to life by the solar warmth of my dear country! But… in all probability, we live in a century too little advanced, and too near the infancy of science, to see such an art brought in our time to its perfection.
—Letter to Jacques Dubourg, April 1773

Well, there is nothing wrong with wishing. And now I recall the saying, ‘Be careful what you wish for.’ ha ha

And in closing…

‘Historically, the music industry has run on hunches. John Hammond is the archetype of what later became known as A&R (artists and repertoire) – the business’s talent scouts. Being an A&R man in the industry’s heyday was a dream job: you were paid to go to gigs and hang out with musicians eager to win your approval. If you spotted more than one or two successes, you were said to have good ears, and handed a fat salary. But the ears of A&R now compete with algorithms.’ Data vs. Hunch